Orchard | Blog

Broken Lightning Cable? Make The Next One Last Longer

broken Lightning cable

If you own any iPhone, iPad or iPod released since September 2012, then you have a lightning cable for syncing and charging. Chances are if you’ve had it for longer than six months, at least one broken Lightning cable.

Apple’s lightning cables have not held up to the average wear and tear from users of their iOS-powered devices, causing many users to complain and be forced to buy a replacement.

The most common issue seems to be the cable splitting near the ends, exposing the wires. This is caused by pulling on the cable while it is connected, and aggravated by the cable being stuffed into bags and not being properly wrapped.

If you’re having trouble with a broken Lightning cable, here’s a few steps you can take to keep it in tip-top shape.

Cord Care 101

  1. Don’t use your phone while it is charging/syncing

Plug it in and set it down. By leaving your phone alone while it charges, you prevent the bending and pulling that can cause the cable to split.

  1. Reinforce your cable before it breaks (at your own risk)

Popular methods use pens springs or paracord. Search around and find one you like.

  1. Wrap your cable when not in use: 

Buy Specialty Cords

Apple certifies some companies to make iPhone accessories that are guaranteed to be compatible, through the Made for iPhone (MFi) program. Some of these companies have gone beyond the basic, crafting cables that solve common problems users have. If you are having trouble keeping your cable in working condition despite the above tips, one of these may be just what you need. But take note – special cords may come at a premium price, although they could end up saving you money in the long run.

For example, Griffin has a retractable cable, making it easier to wrap your cable up to take with you. They also have an extra-long cable which may help prevent pulling if you can’t resist using your device while it charges. Other companies have specifically designed reinforced cables, such as these MOS Spring Cables.

Sometimes it pays to ask

Some people have reported getting a free replacement cord from an Apple store – although there is no guarantee that it will work, it doesn’t hurt to try, right?

Exit mobile version